Tottenham fans have accused the club of “stumbling from one bad decision to another” after unveiling the new in-house ticket exchange that will replace its StubHub deal.

The English Premier League team ended its association with StubHub in June, prompting praise from Tottenham Hotspur Supporters’ Trust (THST), who claimed the resale site’s involvement was driving prices up.

However, the same group is now unhappy with the new Tottenham Ticket Exchange, and particularly its inflexibility. The new system will only allow individual match tickets to be put up for sale once a game sells out. With Spurs playing at Wembley in 2017-18, that means 90,000 tickets sold. Furthermore, purchasers are charged a £7.50 ($10/€8.30) booking and administration fee per ticket.

A statement reads: “Such is the impact of TV that over half of Spurs’ fixtures are rescheduled for broadcast across any given season. That’s before games are displaced due to European commitments.

“This means season ticket holders are essentially buying 19 games ‘blind’. There will be occasions when real life gets in the way of football and matches will be missed.

“The resale platform should enable fans who can’t make a match give others the opportunity to attend in their place while recouping their money. It’s a simple premise.

“We believe the ticket exchange announcement is the latest in a series of mistakes made by the club this summer; mistakes that will have a negative impact on supporters and the club itself.

“Every action has a consequence, and the club has seemingly stumbled from one bad decision to another, increasingly boxing itself in.”

A Tottenham spokesperson told Standard Sport: “We have historically always operated a system where the ticket exchange system only becomes active when the stadium is sold out, however we do reserve the right to open or close the exchange at our discretion at any stage during the sales process.”