A survey by Eventbrite has found that New Zealanders are more engaged with live events than any other nation, especially those with a social cause connected to them.

From music concerts and beer festivals, to more cause-related events like marches and rallies, around 93 per cent of New Zealanders attended at least one live event in the past year.

Meanwhile, 88 per cent of Australians have been socially active, while those in the UK and the US have seen 79 per cent and 78 per cent of its population visit at least one live event this year.

Eventbrite states that its survey reveals that New Zealanders are becoming less materialistic and would rather spend their money on experiences than ‘things’.

It added: “Our increased preference for live experiences is being driven by a strong desire to connect with people, our communities, and the world — and there’s no doubt that the current social climate is contributing to this uptick.”

It also discovered that 87 per cent of New Zealanders believe it is essential for people to come together in person to promote positive change – regardless of age, gender, income, or geography — and one in four said they attended an event supporting a particular cause within the last year.

Meanwhile, the report found that millennials in the country are notching similar numbers to the nation as a whole, with nine out of 10 having attended at least one live event within the past 12 months.

However, 49 per cent of millennials had attended a live event in order to have something to share on social media. Nearly two thirds of this generation also believe that attending a live event is the best way to show other people what they are interested in.

Eventbrite added: “Across all demographics, the sentiment that live experiences have the power to expand perspectives and influence our lives in a way that online interactions can’t, was universal.

“As the live event landscape continues to grow, there’s an increasingly strong demand for experiences that connect us in real life and contribute to growth and positive change.”