Premier League clubs are due to examine whether or not they wish to maintain the £30 ($39/€34) price cap on away tickets at their shareholders’ meeting tomorrow (Thursday).

The three-year contract for the cap runs out at the end of the 2018-19 season in May and some clubs have allegedly been privately questioning whether it should be raised or scrapped completely, The Times reports.

The league’s former executive chairman Richard Scudamore, who left the role last month, is understood to have been a key driving force behind convincing clubs of the benefits of a price cap.

Due to this factor, concerns have been raised that it may be more challenging to come to an agreement this year as there is currently a leadership vacuum after Scudamore’s exit.

The Premier League has still not appointed a replacement with Discovery’s Susanna Dinnage and the BBC Studios’ Tim Davie turning down the chief executive role, leaving Richard Masters, the managing director, in interim charge.

In order for the price cap to be reinstated, 14 of the 20 clubs need to endorse it if it is put to a vote. However, in 2016, eight clubs voted against the proposal prior to strong lobbying from Scudamore.

According to The Times, the “big six” clubs are believed to have reservations for the price cap because their higher ticket prices mean it has a disproportionate effect on their match-day income.

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