Ross Martin, Barclays’ head of digital safety, has warned ticket-buyers about touts ahead of the festival season, following new research from the financial services firm.

The research found that victims are at risk of losing £179 (€207/$231) on average from scammers taking advantage of music fans searching for tickets to sold-out events by setting up fake ticketing websites and social media personas, which is more than the average European festival ticket of £153.

Twenty seven per cent of festival-goers believe purchasing a ticket seen on an advert on social media carries a scam risk yet 29 per cent admitted they would purchase a ticket via this method.

The Barclays research also found that millennials appear most at risk from fraudsters, with a quarter, 26 per cent, admitting they had fallen for ticket scams.

Those people are also more likely to be targeted by criminals multiple times, with 37 per cent falling for at least three different ticketing scams in the last two years.

In addition, 40 per cent of 25 to 34-year-olds admitted they would be prepared to use social media groups to purchase a ticket, despite knowing the dangers.

Martin said: “As we enter the festival season, it is easy to forget our online safety as people look to secure their must-have tickets. Yet, we should all be aware of the risks when purchasing tickets and make sure we are carrying out proper safety checks, to ensure our festival experience is not ruined by fraudsters.”

Martin and Barclays is urging fans to do research before purchasing a ticket and ensuring it’s a legitimate source. He reminds people that they can check whether a website or agent is legitimate by making sure they are of the Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers (STAR), and that they are listed as an approved ticket seller on the event or festival’s official website.

The also warned people to avoid bank transfers, look for a padlock symbol in the web address, and be wary of heavily discounted prices for sought-after events.

Image: Veld Music Festival