A new report on the Danish music industry shows how due to COVID-19 and the cancellation of live events, the industry has lost over 3bn DKK (£3.4bn/$4.66bn/€4bn).

A new report published recently has found that the turnover for Danish concert and festival organisers fell by 52% in 2020. 

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the music industry experienced a decline up to as much as 35% due to the closures, cancellations, postponements and restrictions. The live event segment of the industry experienced a 52% decline in revenue compared to 2019. 

Ticket sales were also hit hard, with the cancellation of events leading to a fall in revenue by 65% compared to 2019. For Danish venues, ticket revenue fell by 51% while festivals lost as much as 97% of their ticket revenue in 2020. 

Esben Marcher, head of secretariat at Dansk Live, which was one of the publishers of the report, said: “The low ticket turnover clearly shows that 2020 was in many ways a year of horror for Danish music. Of course, it greatly affects the organisers, but it has spread rings to the rest of the music scene – including artists, songwriters and producers.”

The Danish Chamber of Commerce (Dansk Erhverv) ordered the publication, with a focus on restarting the live entertainment and music sector in the country. 

Chief executive of Dansk Erhverv Brian Mikkelsen said: “The Danish music industry is characterised by being a cohesive ecosystem, where fluctuations in one part of the industry. 

“We do not yet know the full extent of the consequences for the music industry, but it is quite clear that festivals in particular and the entire live part, including not least the music export, have suffered greatly under closure and restrictions.” 

Mikkelsen added: “Therefore, there is a need to focus on a good restart, and here some of the funds in the Government’s so-called ‘war box’ should be prioritised for the music industry. This has consequences for both exports in the area and for the entire food chain, and it is important that they will be bigger than they need to be.”

The publication was produced by Dansk Live, IFPI, Koda, MXD, Gramex and Musikforlæggerne in collaboration with Rambøll.

Image: Nathan Fertig on Unsplash