Italian ticketing provider TicketOne has petitioned AGCOM, Italy’s communications regulator, to urge the watchdog to enforce measures covered by the country’s new Secondary Ticketing Act.

The act, which came into force on January 1, provides for specific sanctions and interventions when tickets are being resold at prices above face value. As part of its petition, TicketOne, also provided “notary-certified material documenting existing violations”.

TicketOne CEO Stefano Lionetti said at a press conference that the act has the potential to defeat online scalping – if the measures are fully implemented by the authority.

“Over the years, we have intensified all preventive measures against online scalping available to us – but we must go further, because this phenomenon cannot be controlled solely through the primary market,” Lionetti said.

“We have never taken action on the legal level before. The facts show that there was no legal basis to act upon, but now there is a good law in place – one of the clearest and most advanced in Europe – and the time has come to enforce it.

“Although the phenomenon of ticket touting has decreased markedly, there are still three clearly identifiable sites that continue to speculate on the resale of tickets.

“We expect that the measures provided, if consistently and promptly applied, can definitively defeat the phenomenon. This is why we request policymakers and institutions to reopen the discussion in order to minimise the inconvenience for the public, and the risks for businesses.”

Lionetti added that he hoped this step by TicketOne would “lead to a reflection on the actual need to introduce personalised tickets this coming July.”

TicketOne general manager Andrea Grancini added: “Our mission has always been to facilitate and protect the public and this is why we have submitted the petition… to protect honest consumers who should be guaranteed maximum ease of access to events.”

Image: Picjumbo.com