TodayTix, the international theatre-ticketing platform, has secured $73m (£57.3m/€65.4m) in investment to support its content growth and personalisation efforts.

Led by Great Hill Partners, the investment brings the firm’s total capital raised since its last public financing round to $90m.

TodayTix will use the cash injection for internal modifications, including closing out secondary purchases of original investors. The primary focus will be more on outward-facing growth and utilising the company’s proprietary data-driven audience feedback to offer new shows, arts and cultural experiences, as well as doubling down on expanding its technologies in discovery and personalisation for both consumers and partners.

TodayTix chief executive and co-founder Brian Fenty said: “By understanding the ways next-generation audiences purchase and experience shows, we can forever change the way people discover art in their cities.

“Our audiences, married with a community of visionary content creators, establish an unprecedented ecosystem of engagement between the two sides of live entertainment. While ticket sales are the bedrock of our relationships, these are only the beginning of our content and discovery ambitions.”

TodayTix, which boasts 1,300 partners, said that the ticketing platform itself only serves a small portion of the industry’s needs. The company compiled actionable analytics and created access technology to work with more than 900 productions through TodayTix digital Lottery and mobile Rush programming.

Merritt Baer, TodayTix co-founder and president, head of Europe, added: “From our humble beginnings in 2013, to our current global business on three continents serving millions of culture lovers, TodayTix has changed arts and entertainment ticket buying for the next generation. This investment from Great Hill Partners will allow us to take our ambitions to the next level; we couldn’t be more excited about the road ahead.”

TodayTix claims to have sold more than four million tickets to date, accounting for eight per cent of all Broadway tickets sold annually and four per cent in London’s West End.