At first I thought of writing about why blockchain is both technically and economically unfeasible for ticketing, but that was too long and boring, and you, my friend, deserve better.

Tip: If what you’ve read so far has irked you, don’t proceed, it only gets worse.

Then I thought of making fun of how, unimaginative companies, use new words to sell old stuff; “data” being the king these days. Big data, data science, data driven flux capacitor. No matter what you attach to it, it sells better. Maybe Shakira should try that.

It almost seems like we didn’t have any data twenty years ago. Or Excel. Or statisticians. Instead of showing me flashy charts can please someone tell me what technological or mathematical discovery of the last 20 years has improved the way we process data?

Pro-tip: Watching a fifteen minutes video you’ll learn what correlation and regression is and how to calculate them in Excel. As a drawback, this experience will take you to a permanent state of awe wondering why 90%+ of the companies offering data-stuff even exist.

I’ll admit, though, Asimov lost the game to marketers. No matter how much bluff it carries, ‘data scientist’ sounds way sexier than ‘psychohistorian’.

And here’s my point: technology to sell tickets online is relatively easy to make (as crazy as it sounds, the one telling you this is an engineer who works selling tech).

I’m sorry for that horrible experience you had with that other company. Even easy is too hard for some. Truth is, besides few cases (usually the newest and oldest players) every solution to sell tickets online is mostly the same.

Choose the ticketing technology that makes you the most money and go on with the important things in life.

Editor’s note: Content has been provided by Entradium.

Entradium will be sponsoring and showcasing at TheTicketingBusiness Forum in Manchester on April 17-18.